datasheets.com EBN.com EDN.com EETimes.com Embedded.com PlanetAnalog.com TechOnline.com   UBM Tech
UBM Tech

steve.taranovich

's profile
image
Editor

Steve Taranovich is a senior technical editor at EDN with 41 years of experience in the electronics industry. Steve received his MSEE from Polytechnic University, Brooklyn, New York, and his BEEE from New York University, Bronx, New York. He is also chairman of the Educational Activities Committee for IEEE Long Island. His expertise is in analog, RF and power management with a diverse embedded processing education as it relates to analog design from his years at Burr-Brown and Texas Instruments. Steve was a circuit design engineer for his first 16 years in electronics. He then served as one of the first field application engineers with Burr-Brown Corp and also became one of their first global account managers, traveling to Europe, India and China.


steve.taranovich

's contributions
  • 10.12.2012
  • War of currents: Tesla vs Edison
  • Thanks for that additional comment @merlin749----We've certainly come a long way in electric motor drive technology
  • 07.11.2014
  • Solar highway facts and fallacies
  • Let's wait a bit and see if you are right or not. I will be publishing a follow up for all of you on this program and if it is not working, I will be the first to let you know. I hope you are wrong because we need to deploy solar wherever we can along with other alternative energies in order to get away from fossil fuels---of course the cost must be reasonable to us as consumers and taxpayers---I agree with you there. Let's give it a chance before we declare it dead
  • 06.23.2014
  • Can you identify this?
  • A reader, David V., sent me an e-mail with this comment: Regarding your “Can you identify this?” article from June 23: It looks very much like a pair of Helmholtz coils used to generate a uniform magnetic field and the object in the center looks to be an evacuated glass envelope which may contain a thermionic emission source and a set of phosphorescent targets (the picture does not provide sufficient resolution to tell) that are used in the classic experiment to determine the charge to mass ratio of the electron. If this is indeed what it is, you would adjust the field until the electrons emitted hit one of the phosphorescent targets a known distance from the emission source. Applying what you know about the field strength and the trajectory of the beam of electrons you can then compute the charge/mass ratio. I did this very experiment in high school as part of a physics class back in the 1970’s. I remember it vividly even after all of these years.
  • 07.01.2014
  • Book Review: Classic analog design textbook by Professor Sergio Franco
  • I fully understand @MWagner----I just wanted to clarify the textbook character of this book----There is a tremendous amount of mathematical analysis in the book that really goes into great depth in the understanding of the functioning and performance the the electronic architecture. Most textbooks, even Jeffy Graeme's, do not go into such depth
  • 06.18.2014
  • Can you find the missing 1?
  • @Hugocoolens---The master at Noise gain is Michael Steffes---Take a look at some of his articles from his Burr-Brown, Intersil and TI days http://www.ti.com/lit/an/sboa066a/sboa066a.pdf http://www.edn.com/design/analog/4370680/Design-Sallen-Key-low-pass-filters-above-1-achieve-lower-output-noise There are many more by this high speed Op Amp expert in the industry
  • 06.18.2014
  • The third anniversary of the passing of Bob Pease
  • I stand corrected David—see correction in the article above. This is why I love the EDN audience---you guys and gals really read the article in detail---I am really respectful of our readers like yourself who want to be sure that all details, technical or otherwise, are correct. I applaud you.